Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Wednesday, April 13, 2016

Wednesday Vignette: Double Feature

Today I'm joining Anna at Flutter & Hum with two very different photos taken a few weeks ago during a plant nerd outing to view camellias at the University of Portland. My favorite sights weren't the camellias though...

This first image is of a Ribes sanguineum mingling with Euphorbia characias(?). Such a combination might be galvanizing. I can see people loving or hating it, and that's ok. People are allowed to have differing opinions. That shouldn't make people behave like rabid dogs. Luckily plant people are usually much more understanding of this than the average populace seems to be. Personally, I rather liked this combination. It was jarring, but compelling. It helps that I liked the individual plants making up this contrasting duo. The surrounding area obviously hadn't been carefully tended for some time. It had a bit of a wild look, which I liked even more. I love when plant combinations happen on their own.

The second photo is of an entirely different nature. The group wound up at the top of the bluffs, looking out over the shipping area toward the city. I don't love all the industrial city-ness in this photo, but I appreciate it visually. I much preferred looking at the beautiful Quercus garryana and Arbutus menziesii growing on the steep bluff, but couldn't capture a satisfactory photo in the failing light. As with the first photo, you may enjoy this sight or, like me, have appreciated the natural beauty of the trees more. You may even (brace yourself) have enjoyed them differently but equally, for what they were.

7 comments:

  1. A study in contrasts: between the two photos and within each. I happen to really like the visuals of industry, even though the deeper meanings of some might be off-putting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I like certain parts of it. I just vastly prefer natural scenery.

      Delete
  2. I like the combination in the first photograph - the chartreuse of the Euphorbia makes the pink of the Ribes less syrupy sweet. I have my own industrial harbor view, which I've come to appreciate but can't say I love - I'd have loved to have the view of open ocean available on the other side of our peninsula (but we couldn't afford the houses with views on that side).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! The color of the Euphorbia makes it work. I do love Ribes sanguineum, but generally prefer the darker forms over pale ones like in the first photograph. I'm the same with the harbor view. Appreciation, but not love.

      Delete
  3. Tried in vain to comment on this yesterday. For some reason, I've had the worst luck commenting on Blogger blogs... Anyway, as you know, I'm not big on baby pink, but there is something about that combination that is really soothing. I love industrial scenery - especially when there are harbors, boats and water involved. Not sure why - it might be filthy, toxic and nauseating in so many ways, but I still find it oddly appealing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've had complaints about commenting problems before. I wish Google would fix the issue. I agree completely. Not normally a fan of baby pink, but I love this combo, and industrial scenery often has nauseating connotations, but it has a certain visual appeal.

      Delete
  4. Sometimes a photograph is just pretty; One may not like the individual parts of it, plant wise or city panorama, but the result composition is beautiful and striking. And that is what you have here: two very easy on the eye great captures.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for taking the time to leave a comment! I love hearing what readers think and answering questions. I also welcome suggestions for improvement!