Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Wednesday Vignette: A rare wide shot

You don't see many wide shots of my garden. It's hard to be thrilled by views of deer cages surrounding tiny sticks, all swallowed up by the expanse of lawn and empty space of the yard. Owners of city and suburban gardens may resent me for saying this, but it's hard to fill all that space. It takes a lot of inputs: time, money, labor, etc. I rarely take wide shots of the garden because of that, other than to illustrate how empty and undeveloped most of my garden is. The other day, I happened to be walking around inspecting some of those caged plants, eagerly awaiting the day the fence is completed and I can remove all those ugly cages. I chanced to look back towards the new greenhouse from just the right viewpoint.


From this angle, this section of the garden looks full and vibrant. The Siberian irises conveniently hide a huge hole created by the removal of several heathers from the driveway island. I'm also, admittedly, teasing you a bit with an obscured view of the new greenhouse. Water and power still need to be finished, and the benches have yet to be installed, but it looks like a greenhouse, now! Also, the contractor finally came back yesterday to finish setting posts. Crossing my fingers that there won't be too many more delays and the actual fencing will be put in soon.

Wednesday Vignette is hosted by Anna of Flutter and Hum. Thanks for hosting, Anna!

18 comments:

  1. A vignette that speaks volumes Evan! Not long now and it'll be a complete, gardening filled greenhouse :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And very soon after that it will be an over-filled greenhouse. ;)

      Delete
  2. Quite a teaser shot with that greenhouse in the background! Your garden looks great! I remember a time when my garden had very little in it Things do take time, money, and work. The grass is always greener on the other side of the urban/rural fence.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If only I could get paid to work in my own garden. Ha!

      Delete
  3. I willingly admit to a twinge of envy over all that space. One of these days, I will dare to post a view of my cram-scaled haven for the world to see - but not yet. To much work left, and too little time in a day. Vignettes it is - thanks again for joining in, Evan! I can't wait to see what you will do with a fully equipped greenhouse - looking forward to future drooling! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, also - check out this product. A friend who has lots of deer issues, says it works like a charm to keep them away! http://www.plantskydd.com

      Delete
    2. Thanks, Anna. I actually use that product now. Trouble is, you have to have a dry day to apply it. Not hard this spring, but it usually is. Also, I haven't been around much for the last few years and my parents aren't always very good about applying it. And it does nothing to prevent the bucks from rubbing on branches and trunks. We could put the cages up just in the fall, but then you have to find somewhere to store them in the interim and remember to put them back out before the bucks start rubbing. If a plant is small enough, deer can also just step on it and kill or severely damage it. As for your envy, Ricki made a VERY good point. With acreage and rural surroundings, weeding is a never-ending and monumental task.

      Delete
  4. I am one of the few who can empathize. Not only does it take a lot of material to fill up large spaces, but once you do, weeding becomes a gargantuan chore that never ends. You found the perfect angle from which to point your camera.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good, point, Ricki. Weeding is a huge chore in the garden. It's especially bad when your neighbors don't mow their Canadian thistles.

      Delete
  5. No resentment here, I wouldn't know where to being with a garden as large as yours or Ricki's. I am happy with my little lot where I can only get into so much trouble. The thought of having that much space is overwhelming. I'm glad you're up for it, and sharing your successes with us!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm not really sure I am up for it, frankly. I'll keep trying though. It would be easier if I could afford the soil amendments I need, or could convince my parents of their necessity for certain projects. Not to mention helping out with the cost of plants. Come on. It's their yard.

      Delete
  6. When I saw the green house peeking in the back I though I missed one of your posts... your tease didn't not go un noticed. Such a large parcel of land would be intimidating for most, but for a horticulturalist who loves gardening it's heaven on earth. You are very lucky. Once the fence is up, watch out: all the creative energy you held back will be released.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That creative energy is threatening to burst. I'm getting seriously frustrated with the contractor. He came one day this week and not at all last week.

      Delete
  7. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  8. It's a beautiful shot, Evan! The Iris look spectacular and I'm very envious of the greenhouse. I also understand the daunting task associated with planting a large area. While my garden (just over 1/2 acre) isn't nearly the size of yours, it's very large by comparison to my former garden and most of those you find in urban LA. Whereas I could substantially alter the appearance of my old garden with just a dozen new plants, my current garden just swallows up the additions.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Kris! A large garden is wonderful because of all the possibilities, but it certainly does swallow up the plants, doesn't it? I'd love to get a preview of all these things I've planted 20 years from now.

      Delete
  9. The full deer fence sounds really wonderful, it would take care of all your (and my) deer problems. It would be heavenly to not have all the wire fences and cages around my beds and plants. I like all the color in your driveway circle, and different textures. The greenhouse sounds like a great tool too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Hannah. I hope you get a chance to garden without deer someday.

      Delete

Thanks so much for taking the time to leave a comment! I love hearing what readers think and answering questions. I also welcome suggestions for improvement!