Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Wednesday Vignette: Thyme for Spring!

Spring is making a very slow appearance this year. According to the calendar, the season doesn't officially start until March 20th, gardeners in the Pacific Northwest are accustomed to spring arriving a bit earlier. At least, after the last two years, we are. Memories are so short. This year seems to have brought a return to the cool late winter-spring temperatures I remember, where flowers and new shoots unfold at a glacial pace and last forever, not having to worry about heat waves over 70, let alone 80, degrees Fahrenheit. For now, that is. Long-range predictions are calling for equal chances of normal, above average, or below average temperatures, with above average precipitation. So spring is likely to be wet, but temperature-wise we can expect just about anything at this point.

For next week, though, my local forecast is calling for daytime temperatures in the 50s, maybe even approaching 60. Be still my winter-ravaged heart! Today I noticed Indian plum (Oemleria cerasiformis) and native hazelnuts (Corylus cornuta var. californica) just beginning to bloom along the roads. These are two of my favorite small native trees (or large shrubs) and are harbingers of spring in the PNW. In my own garden, hellebores, snowdrops, crocus, and more have all come into full bloom in the last week, and I can see shoots emerging and buds expanding everywhere I look. The awakening of the plants and the birds beginning their spring songs are having a noticeable effect on me, as well, much more so than I recall in years past. This has been a hard winter, and I'm glad to see things coming back to life. While my energy is still catching up, my spirits are rising with the sap in the trees.
Crocus 'Twilight' emerging from lime thyme are such an incredibly vibrant color after the long winter.


Such is my Wednesday Vignette this week. For more, follow the link to Anna's blog, Flutter&Hum, our host for this weekly meme.

8 comments:

  1. Hmmm...I am determined to plant some crocus this fall and this looks like a good one.

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    1. It's a big (for a crocus) dramatic one, for sure.

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  2. Gorgeous crocus! Mine appear to have given up here despite our heavier than usual winter rains. Our rain has stopped (last weekend's storm just spit at us as it blew past) and our temps are now above 80F so I'm declaring winter officially over here. Because we always want what we can't have, I'd have like a bit more rain and cooler temps to make spreading 3 cubic yards of mulch more pleasant.

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    1. In your case, I'd think the lack of winter cold would be more of a problem than precipitation. I don't know if there are any that need less chill. I'm sorry you're getting 80's already. We can't have that here, yet, but I still wouldn't want it. I'm happiest with temperatures in the 60's and low to mid 70's.

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  3. Thank goodness that some plants don't seem to mind this cold wet weather. I'm ready for a sixty degree day or two! Beautiful crocus.

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    1. The early spring blooms don't seem to mind at all. Normally, I don't mind too much either, but after this winter I really want some warmer days so things will really start to grow again.

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  4. I have an almost exact vignette in my own garden. Aren't crocuses great? A lone white crocus that came with the house shows up every year. Although I prefer purple flowers to white, I'm enamored with it, especially on sunless gray days. Large white crocus are now on my wish list for fall. Isn't the garden's awakening thrilling!?

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    1. I have swaths of purple crocus, mostly tommasinianus. It's wonderful to see things waking up, though the crocus are almost overwhelming after this winter.

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