Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Wednesday, January 4, 2017

Wednesday Vignette: Fire in the Snow

I'm starting to feel that I've shared my silver Mahonia confusa way too many times, but here it is again, getting its own feature. It might be that I have it planted where I can see it from my desk while I work, so it catches my eye frequently. I wasn't planning to venture out into the cold at all yesterday, but a glance outside showed the partially snow-covered mahonia glowing in the low winter sun. I had to go out to photograph it.


Like coals burning under a layer of pale ash, the winter color of the mahonia glowed in the sunlight.

Of course, since I was already out in the snow, I snapped a few more photos.

Azara microphylla

Rudbeckia fulgida 'Goldsturm' and Molinia caerulea 'Variegata'

Molinia caerulea 'Variegata'

The random late bloom on 'Goldsturm' could also be a self-portrait of me in this cold weather.
Ok, the snow is pretty. Now it can go away, and take this Arctic air with it. Thanks to Anna at Flutter&Hum for hosting Wednesday Vignette. Follow the link to see her vignette and contributions from other bloggers in the comments.

12 comments:

  1. I took a tour around the garden yesterday, planning to extend it to a longer walk. Feeling like an ice cube after only a few minutes cut that plan short. The blue sky and frozen earth are a compelling combo though, as you have shown here.

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    1. There was a lot more I could have photographed, but I was feeling pretty frozen myself and was quick to scurry back inside.

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  2. That looks to be a LOT of snow! It is pretty - it's too bad that it comes with such cold air. (I'm still bemoaning the below 60F temperatures persisting here.) The Mahonia doesn't seem to mind the cold at all.

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  3. I too would have grabbed a camera and braved the cold for a shot like that. And, I love your self portrait - just perfect! How do you think your Azara will fare in this weather? I planted a variegated one this fall (which I know is less hardy), hoping it will grow up to fill that godforsaken gaping hole in the magnolia, in time. It's fairly protected where it is, but I also wrapped it in a blanket. Fingers crossed they both make it through...

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    1. The azara should be fine. It's rated to zone 7. It is still kind of young, though, so we'll see!

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  4. Well you do manage to make that white crap look pretty.

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    1. At least when it's cold like this the sun usually comes out. That helps.

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  5. You're lucky to have such a beautiful snow blanket. Here what little snow we got quickly melted before the big freeze so the ground is just bare and frozen hard. Your silver mahonia has glorious winter color! Mine stays silver no matter the season. Could be because it's in shade. I agree with Loree, your pictures do make the snow look dreamy.

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    1. Thanks, Peter. My silver mahonia is a little unusual in its winter color. Seems like most of them stay silver. It's even more colorful than it should be, due to stress from its previous location.

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  6. The snow covered dry stems of the Rudbeckia and Molinia are just gorgeous. You must be glad to not have cut them off in the fall.
    I wonder if the glowing mahonia will catch up with her silvery sisters next season or stay 'confusa' forever... in which case you should take some cuttings and try to replicate its incredible colors.

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    1. I leave most things in place as long as possible, unless they turn to mush in winter, though I'm trying to eliminate anything like that from my garden.
      Oh, I already know that mahonia is an exceptional clone. It's even better when it isn't glowing from stress, purplish silver in winter and a metallic sea green the rest of the year. I'm hoping in its new location it will regain that healthy coloring and grow enough that I can take cuttings.

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