Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Abies balsamea 'Nana'

Thursday, October 16, 2014

Foliage Follow Up, October 2014

Yesterday I was thinking about Foliage Follow-up, hosted by Pam at Digging, and realized I hadn't taken pictures of any of the gorgeous fall foliage surrounding me. I hadn't even taken time to walk through Whitnall Park, practically across the road from my new flat. 

Before I get to the fiery fall foliage, since I shared the blooms of some of my orchids, I thought I'd show that at least two of them are no slouches in the foliage department, either.

The foliage of Paphiopedilum Lynleigh Koopowitz always reminds me of a stylized climbing rose or vine pattern against the lighter background. Can you see the dark stems rambling along the surface of the leaf, and the round little flowers?

Paphiopedilum Stella Scope has a subtle silver tone over the entire leaf surface, with more-silvery highlights rimming the dark patches.

And before we move outside, take a look at Amorphophallus atroviridis 'Red Sox'. I'm really loving the skylight in my bedroom, because the natural light from above allows for the full purplish-blue sheen of these leaves show.

Now onto my walk in the park. Glowing maples were the main course on this walk. In the first picture one contrasts wonderfully with blue spruces.

Another maple displays more red, lit from within by yellow.

One thing I'm glad grows in Milwaukee is tree lilacs (Syringa reticulata). I love the fragrant white flowers, but it's the peeling bark of a really good specimen like this one that really thrills me. I know, it's not foliage, but this one was just crying out to have its picture taken.

I think this next plant is some kind of Prunus sp. It caught my attention because of the slightly muted colors in the full spectrum of fall.

There was one area of particularly bright maples in shades of yellow and light orange. Walking just inside the tree cover revealed a golden cathedral that I stayed in for a few minutes just taking pictures and soaking in the honeyed light.

One thing that always strikes me about deciduous forests is how open some of them are on the forest floor. In the PNW I only ever see open areas like this under the densest tree cover, or to some extent in the Hoh Rain Forest in areas dominated by big leaf maples.

One last shot of the Church of Acer before moving on.

The green and russet leaves of this oak look like a painting to me.

Brilliant purple, red, and yellow leaves create a gorgeous display.

This big maple flared within a stand of pines. Another moment of sheer beauty that I just allowed to soak in for several moments.

Here's a tiny glimpse of Boerner Botanic Gardens, located within Whitnall Park. I didn't go into the garden today, but next time I remember to get a pass from work I'll take you for a tour.

One last shot of a particularly fiery maple behind a couple white spruces. Here's wishing you a colorful fall!

17 comments:

  1. That looks spectacular with all those trees putting on rich autumn colours. Indoors, the Red Sox leaves looks almost fluorescent.

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    1. The fall colors here are quite beautiful. There has to be some benefit to moving to Milwaukee. The Red Sox leaves are indeed iridescent when the light hits them right.

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    1. Yes it is! So glad I decided to go for a walk!

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  3. Oh, thank you, thank you, thank you for the gorgeous pictures of maple foliage!

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  4. Beautiful foliage shots! It's an amazing October this year, isn't it? Enjoy! (I'm near you over in Madison.)

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    1. This is my first October in Wisconsin and it is indeed beautiful. Pleasure to make your virtual acquaintance!

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    2. Welcome to Wisconsin! I gather from some of the other comments that you previously lived in the PNW. My understanding is that Southern Wisconsin's winters are much colder, and our summers (normally) are warmer than the PNW. But this year, the West Coast was hotter. Anyway, welcome! And enjoy the autumn color. :)

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    3. Yes, I just moved here from Washington at the end of August. Western Washington winters are much warmer than Wisconsin winters, although much of eastern Washington is just as cold, but much drier. Except for right along the coast where marine fog keeps summers cooler, summers are about the same temperatures as in Wisconsin, hotter in eastern Washington, actually, but it's a relatively dry heat most of the time and it cools down more at night. Thanks for the welcome!

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  5. Gorgeous fall foliage. Trees are just starting to color up here but I fear that the dry summer we had will make for a not so spectacular fall show. Thanks for your beautiful images!

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    1. I remember before I moved seeing lots of vine maples already turning. It certainly was a hot, dry summer. I know some people and plants like that weather, but I hope next year is more moderate.

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  6. I had a lengthy reply all typed out on the iPad last night and instead of hitting "publish" on the left I hit "sign out" on the right. Comment gone. Grrr. Anyway really Peter summed up what I was saying...

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    1. Oh! I've done similar things before on my Nook HD. So frustrating! Fall foliage like this is hard to beat, but I've always appreciated the luminescent pale yellows against the conifers in the PNW.

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  7. So...we've gone from commiserating about gardening PNW style to getting glimpses of life across the country. You remain interesting, wherever you go.

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  8. The orchid foliage is amazing, with the stylized patterns. I like the flaming maple trees and golden cathedral, awe-inspiring. The autumn colors are more intense there. I hope the winter treats you well. We are having our first frost now and high winds and possible ice storms coming up. Brrrr.

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